Writing Short(ly)

How many words does it take to tell a story?

One could argue that using fewer words conveys more meaning and requires more thinking.

Brevity is king.

In fact, many writers prefer to tell stories in short form, guiding the reader on a literary journey – in 100 or fewer, 50 or fewer, only six words, or even 140 characters. Writing shortly, often under the umbrella Flash Fiction, goes by many names. Here are a few:

  • microstory
  • short story
  • short-short story
  • flash fiction
  • six-word story
  • the 140-character story (also known as twitterature)
  • micropoetry

 

cover of a book, how to write short, by roy peter clark

No matter what it’s called, each short-form story has a similar quality:  the writer carefully selects and places words to tell a story. Similar to micropoetry, brevity is key.  Every. Word. Counts. 

 

book cover: 140 CharactersThough I was introduced to wordplay at a very young age (and always encouraged to write and tinker with language), it was not until 2009 when I discovered Twitter and short-form writing (beyond poetry) for the first time. I blogged about it in 2010 and again a few years later {here}. Turns out, short-form writing has a long history! Consider Telegraph messages… stop.  😉

Fast-forward to 2015, when I discovered an interest in visual art – an answer to writer’s block. As I tinkered with colors to heal my heart and head, my writing voice returned and I discovered that ‘writing short’ played a key role in my art pieces.

Carefully selected and places words are often seen, but just as often not seen – buried under layers of color and texture. When you purchase my art, there’s a good chance you’re purchasing my words, too, even if you never see them!

Now in my third year creating visual art, I am reflecting on my journey and continue to think about the process. I am seeing how my earliest pieces are simplistic, childlike – the efforts of a newbie artist, and I’m okay with that. Because I’m also discovering how ‘writing short’ fits into my own artistic style.

I see a growing collection of my words – many blended with colors, some standing strongly in stark black and white, while others hover quietly on brown patina’d book pages and the private pages of my writing journals.

Still, others stick quietly to our fridge and tap me on the shoulder when I walk by, or are pulled from my word notebooks and added to my photographs. Then there are the carefully chosen quotes by others that convey my deepest feelings…

All tell my story.

 

What would your story say?

Author: RobinLK

Robin is a lifelong learner, seasoned educator, writer, artist, and US Navy veteran. She writes and creates to quiet her noisy mind while trying to figure out this crazy thing called life. Some days, it's clear... other days, not so much!

4 thoughts on “Writing Short(ly)”

  1. You are a master at the microstory, both through your art and your words. I don’t ever write flash fiction or microstories. It’s probably a very good exercise, however. I imagine it would make writing synopses and pitches easier.

  2. Hi Carrie,
    Thank you for the kind words. Yes, I find it trains the brain to think succinctly. I used to tell my HS students that short-form writing requires a higher level of critical thinking. They liked that. And… rose to the occasion more often than not. 😊

  3. Loved this post. I think I kind of drifted in that (unplanned) direction a few years ago when I decided to post in 150 words or less. It was a fun challenge to weed out excess words. I still like the idea. Inspired.

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